I’m Moving

I am ‘migrating’ my site from WordPress.com to WordPress.org.

I am being warned that e-mail followers of the blog may be lost in the process.  I will try very hard, loyal followers, to prevent this from happening.  But we are, after all, living in cyberspace, where “no problem”,”easy conversion”, and “effortless” usually mean just the opposite.

I will publish a post on the new site as soon as possible.  If you don’t see a post by September 14th, please go looking for http://www.johnbairdrogers.com.

And thank you all, e-mail subscribers or not, for following and commenting!

The Writing Paradigm

Ponderous title, no?

The paradigm of writing has been one of my discoveries, the kind that slaps you upside the head and then laughs at you when you look back over your benighted stumble toward understanding and realize that it was always there, obvious. You were just too dense to see it.

ParadigmWebster’s defines paradigm as “a framework containing the basic assumptions, ways of thinking, and methodology that are commonly accepted by members of a scientific community.” The OED weighs in less ponderously than one might have expected, “A worldview underlying the theories and methodology of a particular scientific subject.”

I should have reflected on the definition. Strike the ‘scientific’ and you realize that paradigms are ubiquitous: everything from religion to sandwich-making at Subway has its paradigm. And, as I realized over time, I was light on the ‘methodology’ part of the writing paradigm.

When I began, I thought writing was made up of story-telling and mechanics. I quickly learned (i.e., was corrected) that what I called story-telling is Voice, a somewhat mystical characteristic. Part in-born talent, part life experience, the experts intoned. Not something one can learn by rote. Asked for more specifics, the experts universally mumble something about it having to do with the wealth on one’s life experience and … read a lot. I kind of get it.

I had a rock-solid control of grammar and vocabulary (or so I thought). English major, you know. I had read a lot. Couldn’t do much to influence that ineffable quality called Voice. So what more did I need?

Well, a lot. I’ll call it Technique, the methodology of writing. It is the part I’m learning from other writers. It’s the not-so-obvious superstructure of the story that allows the reader to follow comfortably, the choice of point of view and tense, the way characters and time sequences are introduced. Thankfully, this is stuff one can learn.

It does make it hard, though, to do a rewrite on one’s magnum opus and realize just how much one has to learn. Always the optimist, I look forward to the next epiphany.

Genre, quantification and precision

I was just trying to remember how to forward my land line. I went to the Xfinity website. Before I found the answer, though, I was presented with a survey about how my experience was. Which got me to thinking …

It seems more and more of our experience is being quantified, presumably to make various commercial activities easier for merchants and service providers. The power of virtually infinite computer power and the Internet have helped us make a giant leap in the way we slice, dice and parse our lives.

There is some evidence that this preference for classification is hard-wired … a survival skill. And that Babylonian who marked out the first pictographic writing probably worked for the then-equivalent of Amazon. Certainly Aristotle carried the notion of divisions and subdivisions of practically everything forward.

Which brings me back to genre. It’s a conundrum for a beginning writer: to get through the genresvery narrow eye of the needle that leads to a published work, you need to know your genre and state it in the first line or two of a query to an agent or a publisher. Trouble is, “genre” is a pretty vague notion, the more so because published authors routinely ignore it.

Not too long ago, as my weekly writers’ group worked through my first novel, Fatal Score, one of the members said, “This novel is a bit literary for a thriller.”

“A bit literary” made me think of Amazon’s review questions. Amazon is now asking a series of classifying questions that would warm the cockles of Aristotle’s heart when one reviews a book. (Example: How would you describe the plot of this book? Predictable/Some Twists/Full of Surprises). Maybe we should go to a more precise, numerical score for genres. Perhaps a ‘literary-ness’ dimension. (This would of course be a vertical scale with Literary on top and Commercial on the bottom.) Then a complexity dimension (much like the fog index) with board books at one end and a modern philosophy text at the other. There could be many others.

I can just see the first line of the query:

Fatal Score (88,900 words; 8.4 action/6.7 character/5.1 tension/6.4 litfic/7.4 complexity) is a thriller about big data, the brutal reality of future medical care, and an ordinary guy who makes an extraordinary discovery.

Yecccch!

 

 

 

 

Stop Saying “I Feel Like”

One of the many challenges I face as a beginning writer (I can still claim novice status, particularly when making novice mistakes) is the issue of how temporal to be. “Temporal” often means “temporary.” Who knows how long LOL or awesome will last? And, do you really want to date your writing? Then there’s the more complex issue … vocabulary and usage reflect a character’s expressed personality, which is a function of the time and place. “Cool, daddy-o” doesn’t work in a piece set in the 1890’s. Certainly, leave out y’know, like and other limping conjunctions and fillers that are common in conversation … except maybe occasionally, as linguistic spice.  That part I got.

Less obvious is the subtle change discussed in a New York Times opinion piece,“Stop Saying ‘I Feel Like’ ” by Molly Worthen. She notes, “imperfect data that linguists have collected indicates (sic) that ‘I feel like’ became more common toward the end of the last century. In North American English, it seems to have become a synonym for ‘I think’ or ‘I believe’ only in the last decade or so. Languages constantly evolve … But make no mistake: ‘I feel like’ is not a harmless tic. George Orwell put the point simply: ‘If thought corrupts language, language can also corrupt thought.’ The phrase says a great deal about our muddled ideas about reason, emotion and argument.”

So, possibly irritating phrases (such as) “I feel like” don’t get expunged because the help define the characters inner self?  The next big question:  “I feel like” is like fingernails on a blackboard to me, but does it describe a character’s state of mind to my reader?  Am I justifying not including it because I am, after all, an English major living on a higher plane of language?  Is that higher plane really an affectation?

No more questions.  Start, like, writing!

 

 

Writing a Solitary Endeavor?

I grew up with the notion that the novelist was a solitary sort,writer cigarette tucked away in a drafty garret, composing literature for yes, a decade or more.  Then, through a process never very clearly explained, this solitary creature would be FOUND.  A great editor would become friendly; publication would follow. And another iteration of the Great American Novel would be visited upon an adoring public.

Right …

The other day, I was looking for an article on podcasting.  I found the article, but it was slow to load, waiting for <<pop>> a window exhorting me to publish NOW.  For a mere $4,000, I could have that great editor…and publicity…and reviews.  NOW.  I closed the window.

DInner was near, and I was to be the cook.  What temperature to use for roasting vegetables?  Sure enough, Google provided several options.  And the first one said…hmmm, loading slowly…<pop> Publish your work NOW.  Different unusually discriminating small publisher.  For only …

Maybe that garret was a better way.

 

New Titles from Writing Group Authors

Two writing group friends have new books out:

John Harrigan, former foreign service officer and professor has an historic thriller, Crosshairs on Castro.  What if, in the confusion that surrounded the Cuban missile crisis in 1962, the government decided to assassinate Castro?Crosshairs

John weaves this plot around meticulously researched details from the historical record.  Edge-of-the-chair exciting!  See more of John’s writing at his website.

AvailableChat

Jacy Sutton’s Available to Chat is a new take on a very old subject:  Love, lust, and the interesting in-between.  The first line of the blurb is, “People tell Olivia that her online beau may actually help her fading marriage.”  We know how that turns out, right?  Well, no, we don’t.  It’s complicated, interesting, full of great conversations and convolutions.  See more at Jacy’s website.

There’s another coming soon from Karla Jorissen that pits a couple of smart women against a cadre of bad and semi-bad guys.  I’ll let you know …